United Way

Upcoming Events
  • Sat

    Campaign Progress Report

    11:00 am-4:00 pmMWSU Football Game

    Pre-game tailgate, fundraising throughout the game, half-time message by United Way Campaign Chair. 

  • Thu

    Victory Dinner!

    6:00 pm-8:15 pmMWSU Fulkerson Center




Put the power of teamwork into action for our community through your United Way support. Together we improve lives by focusing on the fundamentals – education, financial stability, and health.


Education is an important focus of United Way of Greater St. Joseph. Donor dollars are working to help people of all ages reach their potential through a variety of educational pursuits that will, in turn, strengthen our community. We support quality early learning, youth education in and out of the classroom and a variety of other instruction for life-long learning.


Health is an important focus of United Way. In the Greater St. Joseph Area, campaign contributions help infants through the elderly improve their physical and mental well-being. Health is promoted through fitness and wellness activities, nutrition and in-home services, counseling, and other important programs. Good health is crucial for everyone.

Financial Stability

Stable household finances are important for daily living, which is why United Way focuses on financial stability. United Way supports efforts for families and individuals in crisis to get back on their feet. Thanks to donors, United Way of Greater St. Joseph’s financial stability efforts include food, disaster relief, information and referral, and different shelter services related to homelessness or abuse. Together with Partner Agencies and community leaders, United Way also works to prevent financial situations from becoming problems in the first place.

Here’s a small glimpse of how your donation made an impact in area lives last year:

    • 621 children received early care and education to help them begin their school years ready to learn.
    • 173 incoming kindergartners and their families participated in programs to equip them for kindergarten readiness.
    • 170 children with a disability or special need and their families received services that helped the children work toward important developmental milestones.
    • 36 teen parents continued on with their education or employment throughout pregnancy and after delivery.
    • 414 adults were trained about issues related to occupational safety.
    • 250 children read with 90 volunteers to keep reading skills from decreasing over the summer.
    • 877 people were certified as lifeguards, lifeguard instructors, or swimming instructors.
    • 358 families and caregivers were educated about car seats and proper installation to keep children safe while riding in motor vehicles.
    • 3,674 youth built character, knowledge, and skills through scouting.
    • Through education, 54 parents with at-risk pregnancies improved their ability to provide quality parenting for their infants.
    • 1,037 students participated in after-school youth programs.
    • 974 children received school supplies they needed to begin the school year prepared thanks to the work of hundreds of volunteers.
    • 15,268 documented volunteer community service hours were completed through scouting.
    • 98 children were matched with adult mentors.
    • 28 adults developed skills to be effective leaders in the community.
    • Area businesses partnered with 60+ students in grades 7 through 12 to improve the education level of the potential and current workforce.
    • $26,279,324 in uncompensated medical care was provided to Buchanan County children.
    • 502 senior adults received 105,323 nutritious meals to help maintain health.
    • 1,944 people worked through alcohol and drug addiction recovery.
    • 1,173 women received mammograms or clinical breast exams.
    • 3,461 people received needed mental health services.
    • 1,161 high school students pledged not to drink and drive.
    • 2,826 people were certified in first aid and CPR.
    • 216 people received counseling related to sexual violence.
    • 217 children learned how to stay safe while living on or visiting a farm.
    • Youth and adults completed 238 swimming lessons.
    • 162 young children and teens increased knowledge of safety issues by attending Safety Town.
    • 373 women and their children who were victims of domestic or sexual violence received emergency shelter, and 82 were housed in permanent supportive or transitional housing.
    • 830 men, women, and children received 36,579 nights of emergency shelter.
    • 330 people received budget counseling to help them through financial crisis.
    • $184,435 was saved by area residents on prescription medication with a prescription discount card.
    • Immediate disaster needs were met for 94 families.
    • 391 low-income or elderly people were represented in court at no cost for non-criminal cases.
    • 1,567 people received $1,158,910 in tax refunds through free tax preparation.
    • 189 previously homeless households lived in transitional, permanent, or supportive housing.
    • 111 adults with disabilities held jobs through sheltered and supported employment.
    • More than 6,000 people received clothing they needed at no cost.
    • 22 immigrants became U.S. citizens or legal, permanent residents.
    • 122 people filed proper documentation to successfully maintain legal status or attain citizenship.
    • 43 released offenders successfully remained out of prison while receiving case management assistance to become employed, self-sufficient, and positive members of the community.
    • 55 seniors were transported to medical appointments and community activities.
    • Earned Income Tax Credits were filed for 212 people through free tax preparation, resulting in $184,688 in returned refunds.
    • 810 people provided Christmas to 865 families and individuals in need.

Our Progress

Our Progress