Student Affairs

Online Resources for Faculty and Staff

A Survey of Academic Incivility at Indiana University, Bloomington (Preliminary Report, June 14, 2000). Results of a survey of faculty and graduate instructors asking about the extent and types of incivility they encountered, their responses, and their perceptions about who engages in incivility.

Desperately Seeking CivilityNo, it’s not just you! Many faculty are asking for advice on promoting classroom civility and working with disruptive students.”

The Civility Project of University of Virginia Students and faculty members of the University of Virginia Civility Project compiled 110 rules of daily etiquette for today’s world.

Classroom Civility, Joe Clark (Florida State University).   Links to online resources for encouraging classroom civility organized by type:  General Resources, Discussion Archives, Lighter Side, Workshop Materials, and YouTube Videos.  These links provide a good overview of strategies for dealing with this issue.

Disruptive Student Behavior:  The Entitled Students” by Billie Hara ( ProfHacker– The Chronicle of Higher Education, February 24, 2012).  Examples for discussion of the “entitled” student behaviors similar to those in Mary McKinney’s  ‘oy vey’ article above.

Disruptive Student Behavior:  The Bullies” by Billie Hara (ProfHacker–The Chronicle of Higher Education, November 2, 2010).  Hara contends that the bullying “becoming all too common in our society,” extends to the classroom.  Then presents for discussion several scenarios of classroom bullying and one of bullying within a department.

Should Profs Leave Unruly Classes?”  by Scott Jaschik (Inside Higher Ed, November 2010).  Contends that the university needs to do more to educate students on acceptable and unacceptable student behavior.  Also stresses the need for outlining expectations on the first day of class.